News Releases: Contact Lens

  • Nov. 12, 2013 |  (ATLANTA) Emory Eye Center Contact Lens Practitioner Wins Prestigious Award. (Atlanta) Michael A. Ward, MMSc , FAAO, director of Emory Eye Center's contact lens service, was named the GPLI 2014 Practitioner of the Year, presented for "outstanding professional expertise in fitting customized contact lenses to benefit patients with improved vision and corneal health and to advance the contact lens field."

  • October 7, 2004 |  (ATLANTA) Pass up those costume contact lenses at the flea market or gas station: see a professional
    Just because contact lenses are easily accessible and affordable these days doesn't mean they should be treated as cosmetic items. Because of massive advertising campaigns by contact lens manufacturers in the past, many have come to think of contact lenses as beauty and lifestyle enhancements instead of the medical devices that they are. We can change our eye color at will with a choice of lenses widely available in shades of lavender, green, brown, blue and more. With Halloween around the corner, the opportunity to change looks with a contact lens is enticing, but may be potentially dangerous for eyes. 

  • October 5, 2004 |  (ATLANTA) Fall allergies affect contact lens wear too, says Emory Eye Center: What you can do for more comfortable lenses
    Atlanta in the fall is a beautiful place. Streets canopied by orange and red leafed trees, yellow mums on every corner and bright, blue skies. However, lurking in our crisp, dry air are unseen allergens. While those beautiful fall colors abound, so does the ragweed pollen, which begins to bloom in late August, continuing until late October or mid-November. In fact pollen counts can reach numbers comparable to many a spring day. Ragweed, often referred to as "hardy" because it grows prolifically in undeveloped places, such as fields and roadsides and can travel hundreds of miles in the air, is a prime offender in fall. The following tips may help contact lens wearer compete with fall allergens that face them every time they go outside.

  • October 20, 2003 |  (ATLANTA) Emory Eye Center suggests passing up those Halloween eyes: Over-the-counter cosmetic contact lenses pose unseen dangers
    As the Halloween weekend comes closer, more and more teens and young adults may be in danger of losing sight or contracting infections related to the use of popular over-the-counter contact lenses. These lenses- sold at hairdressers, flea markets and even gas stations- are decorative and especiall3y popular around the Halloween holiday. Some give wearers the appearance of cat eyes, for example, or have holiday-specific themes on them. But whatever their design, lenses purchased from these sources are dangerous-and illegal in the United States.

  • Contact Lens wearers who are allergy-prone can be helped says Emory Eye Center specialist
    Contact lenses wearers who suffer from seasonal allergies can take heart. A few timely measures may enable them to wear their lenses through the spring. Estimates say that some 20 percent of the population suffers from allergic conjunctivitis (red, inflamed eye due to allergy). This discomfort and disruption in their daily lives can cause down time at work and discomfort during their leisure activities. Many a tennis match has had to stop in the spring or fall because of a contact lens problem due to pollen.
    March 25, 2003

  • Treat Contact Lenses with the respect they deserve
    Just because contact lenses are easily accessible and affordable these days doesn’t mean they should be treated as cosmetic items, says a contact lens specialist at the Emory Eye Center. Because of massive advertising campaigns by contact lens manufacturers in the past, many have come to think of contact lenses as beauty and lifestyle enhancements instead of the medical devices that they are. We can change our eye color at will with a choice of lenses widely available in shades of lavender, green, brown, blue and more.
    July 9, 2001

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